Alternative Path

Published On 02/08/2017

ChoudhriIntro

Alternative Path

Epilepsy Program Director and Chief Neurologist James Wheless knows there is no "one size fits all" for managing seizures caused by epilepsy. Discovering the newest therapies and medications is vital to provide the best outcomes possible for children whose ongoing seizures cannot be controlled with medicine, change in diet or surgeries.

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Payton intro

Payton Stanley, 2: Cannabidiol (CBD) drug trial

The year-long trial studies the potential benefits of CBD for children with epilepsy, and Le Bonheur is the only children's hospital in Tennessee to participate.

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James Sain: Diazepam emergency nasal spray drug trial

The benefit of the nasal spray is three-fold: it’s easier, more practical and can be as effective as rectal gel.

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Hannah Lawrence: NeuroPace responsive neurostimulation device

RNS is being used in a limited basis in children, primarily those older than 10 years old, with poorly controlled seizures. 

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Twins before separation

A team of Le Bonheur pediatric surgeons and specialists separated 12-month-old ischiopagus conjoined twin girls in November. The 18-hour procedure involved a team of more than 20 surgeons and physicians from five subspecialties. The girls, Miracle and Testimony Ayeni, are now undergoing rehabilitation at Le Bonheur Children’s after a successful separation surgery.

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Heart Team Le Bonheur

Two years after launching an ambitious plan to grow Le Bonheur’s Heart Institute, the team has expanded nine programs within the Institute, recruited 10 new faculty members and launched a cardiac genetics research program.

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Pulmonology Chief Dubin Le Bonheur

For Le Bonheur's new Chief of Pediatric Pulmonology and Sleep Medicine Patricia J.Dubin, MD, pursuing new treatments for respiratory issues is more than just a passion. It's personal.

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Transfusion Le Bonheur

Small amounts of lead and mercury levels are delivered to premature infants who have received a blood transfusion, and some of these metals are deposited in body organs, according to research led by Le Bonheur Children’s Neonatologist Mohamad T. Elabiad, MD.

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