Search results for: Infectious Disease

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When should I take my child to the doctor if he or she is sick?


When your doctor tells you that you have a virus, that tells you that antibiotics are not necessary at that time.

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Infectious Disease
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What's new with the flu this season?


There are two new flu vaccines available this season which are not made in eggs. Until now, all the viruses used in flu vaccines around the world had to be grown in eggs. Infectious Diseases Chief Sandra Arnold, MD, explains this new advancement.

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Infectious Disease
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Flu season: Be prepared


Le Bonheur wants to help you protect your child from the flu. Jon McCullers, MD, Le Bonheur’s pediatrician-in-chief and chair of Pediatrics for The

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Le Bonehur Services Infectious Disease
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Enterovirus: What you need to know


The enterovirus strain known as EV-68 has been widely reported in the news lately, as the respiratory virus is hospitalizing hundreds of children throughout the Midwest. What is the virus and has it affected our area? John DeVincenzo, MD, medical director of Le Bonheur’s Molecular Diagnostics and Virology Laboratories and respiratory virus researcher and pediatric infectious disease specialist, an...

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Infectious Disease
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Physician breaks down the vaccine schedule process


Who determines when children should receive which immunizations? Dr. Sandra Arnold, an infectious disease specialist at Le Bonheur, explains the organization responsible for these guidelines and its process.

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Infectious Disease
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Chickenpox vaccine explained


A recent study found that the chickenpox vaccine has been successful in decreasing the virus among children. Dr. Sandy Arnold, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at Le Bonheur Children’s, explains the study published in the journal Pediatrics, chickenpox and the need for the vaccine.

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Infectious Disease
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Whooping cough: The importance of vaccination


Children between 3 and 36 months of age who have whooping cough were more likely to be undervaccinated, that is, to have not received all of the recommended doses of pertussis vaccine, according to a new study. Dr. Sandy Arnold, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at Le Bonheur Children’s, explains the study published in The Journal of the American Medical Association Pediatrics, whooping co...

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Le Bonehur Services Infectious Disease