Neural Crest Cell Migration in Hirschsprung Disease Research

Ankush Gosain, MD, PhD, of Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center has focused his research on determining the mechanisms underlying abnormal development of the enteric nervous system in Hirschsprung disease. Gosain recently published a new study in The FASEB Journal delineating interactions between migrating neural crest cells and the extracellular matrix in a model of Hirschsprung disease using a variety of in vitro and in vivo approaches.

Neurons in the wall of the gastrointestinal tract comprise the enteric nervous system, which controls gut motility, digestion, secretion and absorption. During development, neural crest cells, the precursors of neurons in the enteric nervous system, migrate throughout the digestive tract to provide innervation. However, in Hirschsprung disease, neural crest cells fail to migrate into the distal colon, resulting in a lack of innervation in this region. This lack of innervation is a common cause of neonatal bowel obstruction, which can progress to bowel distension, Hirschsprung-associated enterocolitis and death.

Gosain and colleagues specifically focused on abnormalities in laminin expression as laminin is a potential regulator of interactions between migrating neural crest cells and the extracellular matrix in the developing enteric nervous system. The investigators used a mouse model of Hirschsprung disease, the endothelin receptor B knockout mouse, to tease out specific changes in laminin expression.

In the knockout mice, the gene encoding laminin β1 was upregulated more than two fold. By contrast, the receptor for laminin β1, LAMR, showed decreased expression in samples from knockout mice and human patients with Hirschsprung disease. Application of exogenous laminin-111 suppressed NCC migration in an organ culture model, whereas YIGSR, a laminin β1 analog, promoted NCC migration. YIGSR also upregulated expression of LAMR and enhanced NCC migration in midgut slice culture. When LAMR expression was silenced, the beneficial effect of YIGSR was abolished. Furthermore, YIGSR application resulted in colonization of the distal colon in 80% of ex vivo organ cultures from endothelin receptor B knockout mice.

These experiments indicate alterations in LAMR contribute to neural crest cell migration failure in enteric nervous system development. The investigators think YIGSR maysselectively enhance neural crest cell migration through LAMR with LAMR bindingsincreasing LAMR expression and preferentially promoting migration. These results addsto the current body of literature showing interactions between neural crest cells and the extracellular matrix are involved in enteric nervous system development with the extracellular matrix representing a potential target for intervention in Hirschsprung disease.

 

About Le Bonheur Children’s:

 Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., treats children through community programs, regional clinics and a 255-bed state-of-the-art hospital. Le Bonheur serves as a primary teaching affiliate for the University Tennessee Health Science Center and trains more than 350 pediatricians and specialists each year. Nationally recognized, Le Bonheur is ranked by U.S. News & World Report as a Best Children’s Hospital. 

 For more information, please call (901) 287-6030 or visit lebonheur.org. Connect with us at facebook.com/lebonheurchildrens, twitter.com/lebonheurchild or on Instagram at  lebonheurchildrens.

 

About University of Tennessee Health Science Center:

As Tennessee’s only public, statewide, academic health system, the mission of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center is to bring the benefits of the health sciences to the achievement and maintenance of human health through education, research, clinical care, and public service, with a focus on the citizens of Tennessee and the region. The main campus in Memphis includes six colleges: Dentistry, Graduate Health Sciences, Health Professions, Medicine, Nursing and Pharmacy. UTHSC also educates and trains medicine, pharmacy, and/or health professions students, as well as medical residents and fellows, at major sites in Knoxville, Chattanooga and Nashville. For more information, visit www.uthsc.edu. Find us on Facebook: facebook.com/uthsc, on Twitter: twitter.com/uthsc and on Instagram: instagram.com/uthsc.


Posted: 10/13/20

Related News

Influenza A virus directly modulates eosinophil responses
Posted: 8/5/20
Eosinophils residing in the airways of mice respond to influenza A virus (IAV) infection through alterations in surface expression of various markers necessary for migration and cellular immunity responses, according to research published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology by researchers from Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center.
Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital Trial: Intravenous Indomethacin
Posted: 7/22/20
Le Bonheur and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center neonatologists, led by Jennifer M. Davidson, DO, conducted a randomized trial for the treatment of hemodynamically significant PDAs (hsPDAs) in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. Echocardiogram criteria before and after treatment showed that IV indomethacin was more effective.
Le Bonheur and University of Tennessee Health Science Center Physicians Lead Research During COVID-19
Posted: 6/26/20
Several physicians and researchers from Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) have been recognized in Research News Quarterly from the American Thoracic Society (ATS) for thought leadership during the current coronavirus pandemic.